From private to public

Sign posts with Public and PrivateFacebook has been criticised a lot this week for what many perceived as a privacy breach. Users thought they began noticing ‘private messages’ from 2008 and 2009 appearing on their timelines. Facebook denies these claims and states that the messages are simply wall posts that have a different appearance because they were created with an older version of Facebook without the ability to ‘like’ or ‘comment’ (in Mann, McNeill & Atkin, 2012, para.7).

Despite Facebook’s denial, many users still believe they have found evidence of a breach.

Many people panicked when they realised something they possibly shouldn’t have said can now be seen by anyone who can access their Facebook timelines. This incident begs the question – what happens when private turns public?

How much information does your child put on their social media accounts? It is one thing to teach them not to divulge too much information on a private account, but have you thought about what else would be available if all the privacy settings were to suddenly disappear and leave everything in the public’s eye?

It is a good idea to teach children to think about the information they put onto social media as being completely public. This will ensure they think carefully before they type or upload a photo.

A permanent record

All friends have little arguments between themselves, but what if they moaned about it with someone and it was recorded and played back to the friend in question? How would they feel if that friend was able to hear it? How would they feel if a future employer was able to access their gossipy conversations? How would they feel if their future children knew everything they got up to as teenagers? … “What on earth were you doing in that photo, Dad?”

Social media is like a permanent recording. Everything on the Internet is persistent and while you may think your child’s account may have the strongest privacy settings available, technology is not 100% reliable. Things do go wrong.

Think before you type

A group of seventh grade students was asked to write a list of how they think they should behave online. I think you’ll find the list pretty impressive and I recommend showing it to your kids.

So let’s make sure our kids really know how to talk to each other on social media respectfully and imagine that one day everyone is going to read about it, because you never know, one day maybe they will.

References:

Mann, A, McNeill, S, & Atkin, M,. (2012). Users vow to desert Facebook amid latest scandal. ABC News. Retrieved from http://www.abc.net.au/news/2012-10-04/users-vow-to-desert-facebook-amid-latest-privacy-scandal/4295964

Image courtesy of Stuart Miles at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Is your teen’s Facebook status putting them in danger?

 Millions of teenagers around the world are using Facebook on a daily basis, but do they really know the consequences of their status updates?
Recently, an Australian teenager posted photos on her Facebook page of large wads of cash that her grandmother was counting. As a result, two masked men invaded her mother’s home trying to find it. The money was not in the house but they got away with a small amount of cash. Fortunately, no one was injured.
This incident begs the question: do you know what your kids are really up to on Facebook?
As parents, we are responsible for bringing our kids up and teaching them right from wrong, but how many of us know what to teach them when it comes to the digital age? Everything on the Web is persistent and can follow us for the rest of our lives. It is up to parents to guide our children through their Internet footprints so they don’t live to regret the choices they make in their digital lives.
The case above shows unawareness of privacy and trust issues on the Internet. We must teach our children that they never really know who is watching in our real lives as well as virtual.
Have you had a dangerous experience caused by Facebook use?